Category Archives: Physiology and Science

Running more miles relates to faster races for some, but not more injuries

Following twitter I often read arm chair experts draw erroneous conclusions on many studies, so I was not surprised to read world-renowned armchair physiologist Alan Couzans conclude that a recent study by Fokkema et al. supported the notion that high volume is the secret to fast performance. Why? Because Alan’s...
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Everesting at Altitude: Does it matter?

On June 20, 2020, EF Education pro Lachlan Morton set a new Everest Challenge Record a time of 7 hours, 29 minutes and 57 seconds, https://everesting.cc/ less than a week after his first attempt was nullified due to incorrect altitude data; tip: if you need precise altitude data, do not...
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Metabolic efficiency: More smoke and mirrors coaching

ESP Tipcast 89: Clearing the smoke and breaking the mirrors on Metabolic Efficiency This article first appeared July 1, 2016. The article is republished here with a brief addition near the end (BLUE TEXT) The fitness and nutrition market is driven by sexy new terms and training methods. Few have garnered more...
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Home Testing Ideas

In my recent Tipcast I discussed using the current lock down for COVID-19 to conduct your own research projects. The following short article offers ideas and methods for some easy at home tests. Sweat Rate: This one is pretty easy, but takes several tests to get a good average. It’s...
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Indoor vs outdoor power output: Are they different and why?

This article was previously published in January of 2016. With the recent uptick in indoor training, it was worth updating. There is a commonly reported complaint about indoor wind trainers; power output is lower than the road. While Zwift is an awesome indoor training platform, the aforementioned comment has been...
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Aerobic Decoupling: Still just CV drift, and not worth the time

AEROBIC DECOUPLING DEFINED “when heart rate is held steady during extensive endurance training, output may be expected to drift downward. This parallel relationship between input (heart rate) and output (power or speed) is referred to as “coupling.” When they are no longer parallel in a workout as one variable remains...
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